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𝐇𝐞𝐚𝐥𝐭𝐡𝐜𝐚𝐫𝐞 𝐀𝐜𝐪𝐮𝐢𝐫𝐞𝐝 𝐈𝐧𝐟𝐞𝐜𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧𝐬 These are infections that patients acquire during treatment in a healthcare setting, such as a hospital, long-term care facility, or dialysis center. Hospital Acquired Infections (HAI) is the term used by CMS to describe HAIs acquired during certain medical and surgical procedures. These include surgeries of the heart and blood vessels, urinary tract/bladder, gastrointestinal tract, and respiratory system; open-heart surgery; dialysis; and selected skin and wound care procedures. ....#cancer #cancercare #chemocare #cancersymptoms #cancertreatment #chemotherapy #cancercure #cancercells Read more about this topic, in our blog: cancercelltreatment.com/2022/02/17/healthcare-associated-infection/ ... See MoreSee Less

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𝐓𝐡𝐞 𝐅𝐮𝐭𝐮𝐫𝐞 𝐨𝐟 𝐓𝐫𝐞𝐚𝐭𝐦𝐞𝐧𝐭𝐬 Targeted therapy is a treatment that uses drugs or other substances to identify and attack specific cancer cells without harming normal cells. Because targeted therapies are designed to hit specific targets on cancer cells, they are often called “targeted therapies”......#cancer #cancercare #chemocare #cancersymptoms #cancertreatment #chemotherapy #cancercure #cancercells cancercelltreatment.com/2022/03/07/cancer-new-paradigm/ ... See MoreSee Less

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𝐌𝐢𝐧𝐞𝐫𝐚𝐥 𝐑𝐞𝐥𝐚𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧𝐬𝐡𝐢𝐩𝐬 - 𝐕𝐢𝐭𝐚𝐦𝐢𝐧𝐬 - 𝐄𝐧𝐝𝐨𝐜𝐫𝐢𝐧𝐞𝐬 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐇𝐞𝐚𝐥𝐭𝐡 Nutrient interrelationships are complex, especially among trace the elements. A mineral cannot be affected without affecting at least two other minerals, each of which will then affect two others, etc. Mineral relationships can be compared to a series of intermeshing gears that are all connected, some directly and some indirectly. .....#cancer #cancercare #chemocare #cancersymptoms #cancertreatment #chemotherapy #cancercure #cancercells ... See MoreSee Less

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Nutrient interrelationships are complex, especially among the trace elements. A mineral cannot be effected without affecting at least two other minerals, each of which will then affect two others, etc.
#cancer #cancercare

https://elements.envato.com/colorful-minerals-rotates-and-pills-fall-down-CNDN737

𝐇𝐨𝐰 𝐦𝐢𝐧𝐝 𝐚𝐟𝐟𝐞𝐜𝐭𝐬 𝐛𝐨𝐝𝐲: 𝘔𝘦𝘯𝘵𝘢𝘭 𝘩𝘦𝘢𝘭𝘵𝘩 𝘪𝘴 𝘢𝘴 𝘪𝘮𝘱𝘰𝘳𝘵𝘢𝘯𝘵 𝘢𝘴 𝘱𝘩𝘺𝘴𝘪𝘤𝘢𝘭 𝘩𝘦𝘢𝘭𝘵𝘩. #mindfulness
#mindandbody #strongmind
https://cancercelltreatment.com/2022/03/28/sympathetic-stimulation/

𝐂𝐲𝐭𝐨𝐭𝐨𝐱𝐢𝐜 𝘤𝘢𝘯𝘤𝘦𝘳 𝘵𝘳𝘦𝘢𝘵𝘮𝘦𝘯𝘵𝘴 𝘢𝘳𝘦 𝘵𝘩𝘰𝘴𝘦 𝘵𝘩𝘢𝘵 𝘢𝘧𝘧𝘦𝘤𝘵 𝘵𝘩𝘦 𝘤𝘢𝘯𝘤𝘦𝘳 𝘤𝘦𝘭𝘭𝘴 𝘴𝘱𝘦𝘤𝘪𝘧𝘪𝘤𝘢𝘭𝘭𝘺 𝘸𝘪𝘵𝘩𝘰𝘶𝘵 𝘢𝘧𝘧𝘦𝘤𝘵𝘪𝘯𝘨 𝘰𝘵𝘩𝘦𝘳 𝘤𝘦𝘭𝘭𝘴 𝘪𝘯 𝘵𝘩𝘦 𝘣𝘰𝘥𝘺.
#cancer #cancertreatment
https://cancercelltreatment.com/2022/02/27/types-of-cancer-treatment/

Cancer cells have abnormal mutations in their DNA. These mutations allow cancer cells to grow and divide uncontrollably.
#cancer #cancercare #chemocare #cancersymptoms #cancertreatment #chemotherapy #cancercure #cancercells
https://cancercelltreatment.com/2022/04/18/cancer-cell-mutations/

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4 Dangerous Types of Bone Cancer

June 13, 2022
Est. Reading: 6 minutes

smoking and bone cancerBone cancer is a type of cancer that starts in the cells of the bone. The most common type of bone cancer is osteosarcoma, which usually affects children and young adults. Other types of bone cancer include chondrosarcoma, Ewing's sarcoma, and fibrosarcoma. This type of cancer can be challenging to treat because it can spread to other body parts. Treatment typically involves surgery, radiation therapy, and chemotherapy. Early diagnosis and treatment are essential for the best possible outcome. There is no sure way to prevent it, but there are some things an individual can do to lower their risk. These include maintaining a healthy weight, avoiding exposure to certain chemicals, and not smoking.

 

Causes of Bone Cancer

There is no one cause, however, some risk factors may increase the chance of developing the disease. These include:

- Age: The disease is most common in children and young adults under the age of 20.

- Gender: Males are slightly more likely to develop bone cancer than females.

- Family history: Having a family member with bone cancer may increase an individual's risk.

- Radiation therapy: Radiation therapy used to treat other cancers may increase the risk of developing bone cancer.

- Certain disorders: People with certain disorders that affect the bones, such as Paget's disease, are at higher risk for developing bone cancer.

While these factors may increase the risk of bone cancer, it's important to remember that most people with these risk factors do not develop the disease.

 

Types of Bone Cancer and Stages

There are several types, each with its own set of symptoms and treatment options. The most common type is osteosarcoma. Other types include chondrosarcoma, Ewing's sarcoma, and fibrosarcoma.

  • Osteosarcoma: Osteosarcoma is the most common type. It usually affects children and young adults between the ages of 10 and 20 and typically starts in the bones around the knee, but can occur in any bone. Symptoms may include pain, swelling, and tenderness in the affected area. Treatment typically involves surgery to remove the tumor, followed by radiation therapy or chemotherapy.
  • Chondrosarcoma: Chondrosarcoma starts in the cells that make up cartilage. It occurs most often in people over the age of 40 and is more common in males. Chondrosarcoma can happen in any bone but can most likely affect the pelvis, shoulder, or ribs. Bone cancer symptoms may include pain, swelling, and tenderness in the affected area. Treatment typically involves surgery to remove the tumor, followed by radiation therapy or chemotherapy.
  • Ewing's Sarcoma: Ewing's sarcoma is a type of bone cancer that usually affects children and young adults between 10 and 20. It typically starts in the bones of the pelvis, leg, or arm. Symptoms may include pain, swelling, and tenderness in the affected area. Treatment typically involves surgery to remove the tumor, followed by radiation therapy or chemotherapy.
  • Fibrosarcoma: Fibrosarcoma is a type of bone cancer that starts in the connective tissue of the bone. It can occur at any age but is most common in people over 40 and can happen in any bone but can most likely affect the pelvis or femur. Symptoms may include pain, swelling, and tenderness in the affected area. Treatment typically involves surgery to remove the tumor, followed by radiation therapy or chemotherapy.

There are also a few different types of benign bone tumors:

  • Osteochondroma: Osteochondromas are the most common type of benign bone tumor. They usually affect children and young adults between the ages of 10 and 20. Osteochondromas typically occur in the pelvis, shoulder, or knee bones. They may not cause any symptoms but can sometimes be associated with pain, swelling, or tenderness in the affected area. Treatment is typically not necessary unless the tumor is causing symptoms or is at risk of turning into cancer.
  • Osteoma: An osteoma is a small, benign tumor that starts in the bone. Osteomas usually don't cause any symptoms but can sometimes be associated with pain or tenderness in the affected area. Treatment is typically not necessary unless the tumor is causing symptoms or is at risk of turning into cancer.
  • Osteoid osteoma: An osteoid osteoma is a small, benign tumor that starts in the bone. Osteoid osteomas usually don't cause any symptoms but can sometimes be associated with pain or tenderness in the affected area. Treatment is typically not necessary unless the tumor is causing symptoms or is at risk of turning into cancer.
  • Giant cell tumor: A giant cell tumor is a type of benign bone tumor that usually affects adults between 20 and 50. Giant cell tumors can occur in any bone but are most common in the bones of the pelvis, leg, or arm. They may not cause any symptoms but can sometimes be associated with pain, swelling, or tenderness in the affected area. Treatment is typically not necessary unless the tumor is causing symptoms or is at risk of turning into cancer.

Bone cancer is typically diagnosed in one of three stages:

- Stage I: The cancer is confined to the bone.

- Stage II: Cancer has spread to nearby tissues or organs.

- Stage III: Cancer has spread to distant parts of the body.

Diagnosing and Treating Bone Cancer 

Bone cancer is typically diagnosed after a person experiences symptoms and visits their doctor. Diagnosis begins with a physical exam and medical history. The doctor will ask about an individual's symptoms and risk factors for the disease. They will also perform a physical exam to look for signs of bone cancer.

bone cancer symptoms

Imaging tests may also diagnose bone cancer. These tests can create pictures of the inside of the body and are used to look for tumors. Imaging tests used to diagnose bone cancer include X-rays, computed tomography (CT) scans, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans, and positron emission tomography (PET) scans.

  • X-rays: X-rays create images of the inside of the body. They help look for tumors or other abnormalities.
  • CT Scans: CT scans use X-rays and computers to create detailed pictures of the inside of the body. CT scans identify tumors or other abnormalities.
  • MRI Scans: MRI scans use magnetic fields and radio waves to create detailed pictures of the inside of the body.
  • PET Scans: PET scans use radioactive tracers to create pictures of the inside of the body.

A biopsy is the only way to diagnose bone cancer definitively. If the doctor suspects bone cancer, they will perform a biopsy. During a biopsy, a tissue sample is removed from the body and examined for cancer cells.

Treatment for bone cancer depends on the type of cancer, its stage, and the person's age and overall health. Treatment options include surgery, radiation therapy, and chemotherapy.

 

  • Surgery: Surgery is the most common treatment for bonebone cancer surgery cancer. The goal of surgery is to remove the tumor while preserving as much normal tissue as possible. Surgery may remove the entire tumor (resectable tumor) or just a portion of it (debulking surgery). Radiation therapy or chemotherapy may be given before or after surgery to kill any remaining cancer cells.
  • Radiation Therapy: Radiation therapy uses high-energy X-rays or particles to kill cancer cells. Doctors may also use it to relieve pain in people with bone cancer that has spread to the bone marrow. Radiation therapy may be given before or after surgery.
  • Chemotherapy: Chemotherapy uses drugs to kill cancer cells and may be given before or after surgery.
  • Targeted Therapy: Targeted therapy is a type of treatment that uses drugs or other substances to identify and attack specific cancer cells without harming normal cells.
  • Clinical Trials: Clinical trials are research studies that test new treatments. Clinical trials are an essential option for people with all types of cancer. People with bone cancer may be eligible to participate in clinical trials.

 

Bone cancer can be a difficult journey for both the person diagnosed and their loved ones. There are several resources available to help people cope with it.

The Bone Cancer Society is a nonprofit organization that provides support and information for people with bone cancer. The organization offers various services, including support groups, educational resources, and financial assistance.

CancerCare is a national nonprofit organization that provides free, professional support services for people affected by cancer. Services include counseling, support groups, education, and financial assistance.

The American Cancer Society also offers a variety of resources for people affected by cancer, including information about treatment options, coping with cancer, and finding support.

Bone Cancer Prevention 

There are several things an individual can do to reduce their risk of developing bone cancer.

- Maintain a healthy weight. Obesity increases the risk of developing bone cancer.

- Avoid tobacco use. Smoking cigarettes increases the risk of developing bone cancer.

- Get regular exercise. Exercise helps maintain a healthy weight and strengthens bones.

- Eat a nutritious diet. A healthy diet helps maintain a healthy weight and provides the nutrients needed for strong bones.

- Limiting alcohol intake. Drinking too much alcohol increases the risk of developing bone cancer.

- Protect skin from the sun. Ultraviolet (UV) rays from the sun can damage DNA and increase the risk of developing bone cancer. Wear sunscreen with an SPF of at least 15 and avoid direct sunlight.

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