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𝐇𝐞𝐚𝐥𝐭𝐡𝐜𝐚𝐫𝐞 𝐀𝐜𝐪𝐮𝐢𝐫𝐞𝐝 𝐈𝐧𝐟𝐞𝐜𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧𝐬 These are infections that patients acquire during treatment in a healthcare setting, such as a hospital, long-term care facility, or dialysis center. Hospital Acquired Infections (HAI) is the term used by CMS to describe HAIs acquired during certain medical and surgical procedures. These include surgeries of the heart and blood vessels, urinary tract/bladder, gastrointestinal tract, and respiratory system; open-heart surgery; dialysis; and selected skin and wound care procedures. ....#cancer #cancercare #chemocare #cancersymptoms #cancertreatment #chemotherapy #cancercure #cancercells Read more about this topic, in our blog: cancercelltreatment.com/2022/02/17/healthcare-associated-infection/ ... See MoreSee Less

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𝐓𝐡𝐞 𝐅𝐮𝐭𝐮𝐫𝐞 𝐨𝐟 𝐓𝐫𝐞𝐚𝐭𝐦𝐞𝐧𝐭𝐬 Targeted therapy is a treatment that uses drugs or other substances to identify and attack specific cancer cells without harming normal cells. Because targeted therapies are designed to hit specific targets on cancer cells, they are often called “targeted therapies”......#cancer #cancercare #chemocare #cancersymptoms #cancertreatment #chemotherapy #cancercure #cancercells cancercelltreatment.com/2022/03/07/cancer-new-paradigm/ ... See MoreSee Less

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𝐌𝐢𝐧𝐞𝐫𝐚𝐥 𝐑𝐞𝐥𝐚𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧𝐬𝐡𝐢𝐩𝐬 - 𝐕𝐢𝐭𝐚𝐦𝐢𝐧𝐬 - 𝐄𝐧𝐝𝐨𝐜𝐫𝐢𝐧𝐞𝐬 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐇𝐞𝐚𝐥𝐭𝐡 Nutrient interrelationships are complex, especially among trace the elements. A mineral cannot be affected without affecting at least two other minerals, each of which will then affect two others, etc. Mineral relationships can be compared to a series of intermeshing gears that are all connected, some directly and some indirectly. .....#cancer #cancercare #chemocare #cancersymptoms #cancertreatment #chemotherapy #cancercure #cancercells ... See MoreSee Less

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Nutrient interrelationships are complex, especially among the trace elements. A mineral cannot be effected without affecting at least two other minerals, each of which will then affect two others, etc.
#cancer #cancercare

https://elements.envato.com/colorful-minerals-rotates-and-pills-fall-down-CNDN737

𝐇𝐨𝐰 𝐦𝐢𝐧𝐝 𝐚𝐟𝐟𝐞𝐜𝐭𝐬 𝐛𝐨𝐝𝐲: 𝘔𝘦𝘯𝘵𝘢𝘭 𝘩𝘦𝘢𝘭𝘵𝘩 𝘪𝘴 𝘢𝘴 𝘪𝘮𝘱𝘰𝘳𝘵𝘢𝘯𝘵 𝘢𝘴 𝘱𝘩𝘺𝘴𝘪𝘤𝘢𝘭 𝘩𝘦𝘢𝘭𝘵𝘩. #mindfulness
#mindandbody #strongmind
https://cancercelltreatment.com/2022/03/28/sympathetic-stimulation/

𝐂𝐲𝐭𝐨𝐭𝐨𝐱𝐢𝐜 𝘤𝘢𝘯𝘤𝘦𝘳 𝘵𝘳𝘦𝘢𝘵𝘮𝘦𝘯𝘵𝘴 𝘢𝘳𝘦 𝘵𝘩𝘰𝘴𝘦 𝘵𝘩𝘢𝘵 𝘢𝘧𝘧𝘦𝘤𝘵 𝘵𝘩𝘦 𝘤𝘢𝘯𝘤𝘦𝘳 𝘤𝘦𝘭𝘭𝘴 𝘴𝘱𝘦𝘤𝘪𝘧𝘪𝘤𝘢𝘭𝘭𝘺 𝘸𝘪𝘵𝘩𝘰𝘶𝘵 𝘢𝘧𝘧𝘦𝘤𝘵𝘪𝘯𝘨 𝘰𝘵𝘩𝘦𝘳 𝘤𝘦𝘭𝘭𝘴 𝘪𝘯 𝘵𝘩𝘦 𝘣𝘰𝘥𝘺.
#cancer #cancertreatment
https://cancercelltreatment.com/2022/02/27/types-of-cancer-treatment/

Cancer cells have abnormal mutations in their DNA. These mutations allow cancer cells to grow and divide uncontrollably.
#cancer #cancercare #chemocare #cancersymptoms #cancertreatment #chemotherapy #cancercure #cancercells
https://cancercelltreatment.com/2022/04/18/cancer-cell-mutations/

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4 Revealing Tongue Cancer Stages

June 6, 2022
Est. Reading: 3 minutes

Tongue cancer is a type of cancer that develops in the tongue. The tongue comprises two types of tissue, squamous cells, and glandular cells. Tongue cancer can develop in either type of cell, but most cases occur in the squamous cells. Tongue cancer is more common in men than women, and the average age at diagnosis is 60. Further on, we will talk about tongue cancer stages.

Causes and Risk Factors of Tongue Cancer

Several risk factors can increase your chance of developing tongue cancer, including:

tongue cancer from smoking

 

-Tobacco use: People can develop tongue cancer from smoking. Smoking tobacco is the most common cause of tongue cancer. Chewing tobacco and snuffing also increases a person's risk.

-Heavy alcohol use: Drinking alcohol increases the risk of tongue cancer, especially if a person smokes tobacco.

-HPV on Tongue: Infection with the human papillomavirus (HPV) is a risk factor for tongue cancer. HPV on the tongue is a sexually transmitted virus that can cause abnormal changes in the cells of the tongue.

-Oral hygiene: Poor oral hygiene and dental health can increase the risk of tongue cancer.

-Diet: A diet low in fruits and vegetables may increase the risk of tongue cancer.

-Age: Tongue cancer is more common in people over the age of 50.

Tongue Cancer Symptoms

The symptoms of tongue cancer can vary depending on the size and location of the tumor. Tongue cancer often starts as a small, painless sore that does not heal on the tongue. The sore may bleed easily and appear as a red or white patch on the tongue. Tongue cancer may also cause problems with chewing, swallowing, or speaking.

Other tongue cancer symptoms can include:

-A sore throat that does not go away

-Painful swallowing

-Weight loss

-Bad breath

-Ear pain

Tongue Cancer Stages

Tongue cancer stages range from I to IV. Tongue cancer caught in the early stages (I and II) can often be cured with surgery and radiation therapy. Tongue cancer that has spread to other body parts (stage IV) is more challenging to treat and is often incurable.

 tongue cancer stages

Tongue cancer stages are differentiated as follows:

  • Stage I Tongue Cancer: In stage I tongue cancer, the tumor is 2 centimeters (cm) or less and has not spread to nearby lymph nodes or other body parts.
  • Stage II Tongue Cancer: In stage II tongue cancer, the tumor is more significant than 2 cm but has not spread to nearby lymph nodes or other body parts.
  • Stage III Tongue Cancer: In stage III tongue cancer, the tumor has spread to nearby lymph nodes but has not spread to other body parts.
  • Stage IV Tongue Cancer: In stage IV tongue cancer, the tumor has spread to other body parts, such as the lungs or liver.

Diagnosing and Treating Tongue Cancer 

If a person has symptoms of tongue cancer, their doctor will perform a physical examination and take a medical history. The doctor may also order one or more tests to make a diagnosis.

Tests used to diagnose tongue cancer include:

-Biopsy: A biopsy removes a small piece of tissue from the tongue for examination under a microscope. A biopsy is the only way to diagnose tongue cancer definitively.

-Imaging tests: Imaging tests such as X-rays, computed tomography (CT) scans, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans look for tumors in the tongue.

-Endoscopy: An endoscope is a thin, flexible tube with a light and camera used to examine the inside of the throat.

After performing the tests, the doctor will review the results and diagnose. If a person gets tongue cancer, their doctor will stage cancer to determine its extent. Staging is necessary because it helps guide treatment decisions.

The treatment for tongue cancer depends on the stage of the disease, the patient's overall health, and preferences. Treatment options for tongue cancer include surgery, radiation therapy, and chemotherapy.

  • Surgery is the most common treatment for tongue cancer. The type of surgery performed will depend on the stage of the disease. Tongue cancer caught early may be treated with partial removal of the tongue (partial glossectomy). More advanced tongue cancer may require total removal of the language (total glossectomy). Surgery may also remove lymph nodes in the neck affected by cancer.
  • Radiation therapy uses high-energy beams to kill cancer cells. Radiation therapy can be used before or after surgery, and doctors may use it in combination with chemotherapy.
  • Chemotherapy is a treatment that uses drugs to kill cancer cells. Chemotherapy can be given intravenously or orally, and it is often used in combination with radiation therapy.

After treatment, a patient will be closely monitored for signs of cancer recurrence. Follow-up appointments may include physical examinations, imaging tests, and blood tests. These appointments are essential to ensure that cancer has not returned.

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