What We Do Not Understand About Cancer

In 1761, Giovanni Morgagni of Padua was the first to do something that is now routine; he did autopsies to relate the patient’s illness to pathological findings after death. This research laid the foundation for scientific oncology, the study of cancer. A century later, the development of anesthesia allowed surgery to flourish, and classic cancer operations such as the radical mastectomy were developed.

By the middle of the 20th century, researchers found most of the things that caused cancer (carcinogens) cause genetic damage (mutations) that looked a lot like the mutations Continue reading