Hyperbaric Oxygen In Cancer Treatment

It has been long known in the medical field that that proper healing of the body and resistance to infection cannot occur without oxygen. Oxygen is believed to be required for all the major processes involved in wound healing, including resistance to infection, activation of fibroblasts, collagen deposition, angiogenesis, and epithelization. Under normal circumstances, oxygen is carried through the body by red blood cells only, this is sufficient for a healthy person to have all the oxygen required to maintain normal functioning. But what about when someone is sick and how does this play a role in cancer treatment? Continue reading

The Evolution Of Cancer Cells – Why Cancer Is So Hard To Kill?

The current standard of care for cancer is a very general “one-size-fits-all” therapy and the more we learn about cancer the more we realize that all cancers are different and the treatment is becoming less and less realistic. The problem with chemotherapy is that it has no way to directly target cancer cells. Chemotherapy acts by killing any cell that is in the process of dividing. Ideally, because cancer cells divide much more rapidly than normal cells, they are targeted more. However, the more we learn about the adaptability of cancer cells that enable them to evade certain therapies, combined with the fact that there are several systems of healthy cells that are also constantly dividing, we are forced to rethink the future of cancer therapies. For example, hair cells, skin cells, intestine cells and bone marrow cells are all normal healthy cells that are constantly dividing and therefore suffer from chemotherapy. In the bone marrow is where new blood cells are constantly being made (about 500 billion cells per day), this includes red and white blood cells. Continue reading

Cancer – Free Radicals – Reactive Oxygen Species – Killer Cells – SOD – How Are They Linked?

Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS) is a phrase used to describe a number of reactive molecules and free radicals derived from molecular oxygen. The production of oxygen-based radicals is the bane to all aerobic species. These molecules, produced as byproducts during the mitochondrial electron transport of aerobic respiration or by oxidoreductase enzymes and metal-catalyzed oxidation, have the potential to cause a number of deleterious events. Continue reading

Sarcoma, The Cancer Of Connective Tissues

Sarcoma is a rare cancer in adults (1% of all adult cancers), but  prevalent in children (about 20% of all childhood cancers). It is made up of many “subtypes” because it can arise from a variety of tissue structures (nerves, muscles, joints, bone, fat, blood vessels – collectively referred to as the body’s “connective tissues”). Because these tissues are found everywhere on the body, Sarcomas can arise anywhere. Thus, within each site of the more “common” cancers there is the occasional surprise sarcoma diagnosis (e.g., breast sarcoma, stomach sarcoma, lung sarcoma, ovarian sarcoma, etc.). The most frequent location are the limbs since this is where the majority of the body’s connective tissue resides. They are commonly hidden deep in the body, so sarcoma is often diagnosed when it has already become too large to expect a hope of being cured. Although a lot of the lumps and bumps we get are benign, people should have them looked at by a doctor at an early stage in case it is sarcoma.

An example of Soft Tissue Sarcoma

An example of Soft Tissue Sarcoma

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The Breast Cancer Awareness Month: Prevention Is The Best Cure

breast_cancer_awareness

United we can eradicate the problem

Every year, worldwide, October is the Breast Cancer Awareness Month. Each year, there are nearly 1.38 million cases and nearly 450 000 deaths from breast cancer. According to the World Health Organization, this type of cancer is the most common in women worldwide. According to the Office of Disease Prevention And Health Promotion, about 1 in 8 women in the United States will get breast Cancer at some point.

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Overview of Skin Cancer Tumors – Melanoma – Squamous Cell Carcinoma – Basal Cell Carcinoma

Each year in the U.S. over 5.4 million cases of non melanoma skin cancer are treated. Skin cancer is the most common of all human cancers. Cancer occurs when normal cells transform, grow and multiply without normal controls. They form a tumor. Tumors are cancerous only if they are malignant. They encroach on and invade neighboring tissues. Continue reading

The Growth of Cancer Cells and Cancer Stem Cells

Cancer cells are cells gone wrong, in other words, they no longer respond to many of the signals that control cellular growth and death as described in the Krebs Cycle. Cancer cells originate within tissues and, as they grow and divide, they change even further from normalcy.

Over time, these cells become increasingly resistant to the controls that maintain normal tissue and as a result, they divide more rapidly than their progenitors and become less dependent on signals from other cells. Cancer cells even evade programmed cell death, despite the fact that their multiple abnormalities would normally make them prime targets for apoptosis. In the late stages of cancer, cells break through normal tissue boundaries and metastasize (spread) to new sites in the body. Continue reading